Valerie Bertinelli: Taking Her Career One Day at a Time

As we wind up the “Valerie”-themed blogs, of course we have to include Valerie Bertinelli.

I’m guessing Valerie Bertinelli might have chosen a different career than acting if her family moves had been to other US cities. She was born in Delaware where her father was an executive with General Motors. Apparently, sometime during her childhood, the family (she has three brothers) lived in Louisiana, Oklahoma, and Michigan though I could not find definite dates. Barbara ended up in California during high school. When she lived in California, one of her friend’s dad was a television producer.

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She transferred to the Tami Lynn School of Artists to study acting, and Tami Lynn became her personal manager during the 1970s. Unlike child stars who appear on various shows before getting their big chance, Valerie appeared in one episode of Apple’s Way in 1974 and then was offered the role of Barbara Cooper on One Day at a Time which ran from 1975-1984. During the show’s run, she showed up in the Nancy Drew Mysteries show, one movie, and five made-for-television movies.

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One Day at a Time was one of Norman Lear’s string of 1970s hits. Bonnie Franklin starred as a divorced mother trying to raise two daughters, Barbara and Julie (Mackenzie Phillips). Schneider (Pat Harrington Jr.) was the maintenance man who became part of their “family.” Valerie was fifteen when the show began. She quickly became one of America’s sweethearts. Although it was a comedy, the show covered some darker subjects. It cast dealt with a lot of drama due to Mackenzie’s drug addiction and personal problems.

LOS ANGELES – MAY 3: ONE DAY AT A TIME cast members, (clockwise from top) Mackenzie Phillips (as Julie Cooper); Valerie Bertinelli (as Barbara Cooper) and Bonnie Franklin (as Ann Romano). (Photo by CBS via Getty Images)

In 1981 Valerie took her brother to a Van Halen concert and met Eddie Van Halen. They dated but got married sooner than most people expected. The marriage had a lot of ups and downs; the couple had a son, but by 2001 they separated and divorced in 2007.

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When One Day at a Time ended (it was not cancelled by the network, but Bertinelli and Franklin were ready to move on in their careers), Bertinelli again took on one movie role and quite a few television movies.

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Valerie turned down several offers because of nudity. She was in the running as Ariel in Footloose and as Chloe in The Big Chill. With no major movie offers, Bertinelli returned to television to star in Sydney in 1990. Matthew Perry costarred in this show as Sydney’s brother, a rookie cop. Sydney moves to New York and opens a detective agency. The show only lasted a season.

Valerie Bertinelli and Matthew Perry (Photo by Ron Galella, Ltd./Ron Galella Collection via Getty Images)

In 1993, she again gave television a try, starring in Café Americain. On this show, Valerie is Holly Aldrige, a young American living in France. She gets a job as a waitress at a café where she meets a quirky group of people who become friends, despite her inability to speak French. Unfortunately, this one also lasted one season.

In 2001, Valerie joined the cast of Touched by an Angel for the show’s final two seasons, playing Gloria.

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From 2010-2015 she was one of the stars in what might be her favorite role, Melanie Moretti on Hot in Cleveland. Three friends (Bertinelli, Jane Leeves, and Wendie Malick) are heading for Paris when their plane is forced to make an emergency landing in Cleveland. The three pals decide to stay in the city because they think they will be more popular with men in Cleveland than Paris. Their new landlord is Betty White.

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I reference this as perhaps her favorite role because it didn’t have any of the drama of One Day at a Time, and she seemed to truly enjoy her time on the show and her castmates. She said her favorite time of day was sharing coffee with her costars on the show. In a Yahoo Entertainment interview, she said “I mean, if Hot in Cleveland came back, I would be there yesterday. I miss that show so much.”

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Bertinelli has also discussed working with legend Betty White: “I mean we all know Betty’s funny, obviously, but there was such an ease to it. I know people think I’m crazy when I say this, but she literally glowed. She’s not of this world. She’s just got this beautiful glow aura about her, just because she’s such a kind, sweet soul. And I just adore her.”

HOT IN CLEVELAND co-stars, from left, Jane Leeves, Betty White, Valerie Bertinelli and Wendie Malick pose for a portrait on Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2012 in New York. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

Bertinelli also loved the rapport shared by the stars that shined through their performances. As she described them: “You can see how these characters love each other no matter what, no matter how stupid they get. I think it’s just the way we feel about each other, and plus, the writers happen to write some really, really funny shows. I mean, the writers on this were just beyond funny.” The cast still keeps in touch regularly.

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During the run of the show, Valerie married Tom Vitale whom she had been involved with for seven years.

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Since the end of Hot in Cleveland, Valerie has found a new career as a cooking star. She has hosted Valerie’s Home Cooking, Kids Baking Championship, Family Food Showdown, and Family Restaurant Rivals on the Food Network. Valerie won two Emmys for her Valerie’s Home Cooking show.

Valerie has a couple of famous relatives. Courteney Cox is a cousin, and when Bertinelli appeared on the show, Who Do You Think You Are? about genealogy, she learned she was related to Kind Edward I of England through her mother.

Valerie recently reflected on the reboot of One Day at a Time which features a Cuban family. Although most of the recent reboots have been flops, this show seems to be holding its own. Bertinelli discussed it: “It’s an amazing show. The women that are doing it are really so talented, and it’s got a lot to say . . . they’re doing a great job of staying topical . . . and shining a light on things that we need to look at. And keeping it funny at the same time.”

Perhaps we’ve learned more about Valerie through her cooking show than her acting. What do we know? The first dish she learned to make was lasagna. Her favorite cookbooks are by Ina Garten because “when you follow her directions, it really comes out perfectly.”

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Coconut creamer is her must-have item, but she admits that she is a condiment horder especially with mustard, having about fifteen in her fridge. She loves lemon desserts, prefers savory over sweet, and likes to cook to music.

Her favorite food cities are Los Angeles and New Orleans. She credits her mother and grandmother with teaching her to cook. If she held a dinner party and could invite anyone, dead or alive, she would include Jesus, Pope Francis, Barak Obama, and Marilyn Monroe.

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Valerie’s personal life has been filled with a lot of highs and lows, like the rest of us, but she seems to have settled into a place where she is happy and productive and just enjoying what she is doing. You can’t ask for more than that.

Hey, Hey They’re The Monkees: Then Who Are Those Guys Writing Songs and Playing Instruments?

We are continuing our Oddly Wonderful series and today’s show captures the theme perfectly.

There were quite a few shows from the 1960s that just can’t be viewed outside that decade because they were such an anchor to the psychedelic flower power times of that era—Laugh-In, Batman, Lost in Space, and The Banana Splits were some of those series. The Monkees was another one of those shows.

Recently I watched a couple of episodes, both about Davey’s love life. The shows always had a plot, but sometimes you had to search long and hard for it. It was even more bizarre than I remembered. It was like a creepy bug. You weren’t sure it was safe, but you couldn’t turn away from it either.

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The show was put on the fall schedule of 1966 on Mondays. It is quite memorable to most viewers from that time, yet it was only on the air a year and a half, producing 58 episodes.

Riding on the coat-tails of the Beatles, the show featured a four-member band. The only thing in common about each episode was that it featured one of their songs. Many of the shows were surreal and featured bizarre encounters.

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Filmmakers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider who created Raybert Productions were inspired by the film A Hard Day’s Night starring the Beatles. They decided to develop a television show with a similar vibe. Screen Gems agreed to it, and they asked Paul Mazursky and Larry Tucker to write a script for the pilot.

Sponsors were secured. Yardley of London and Kellogg’s Cereals alternated weeks. Yardley sold a variety of beauty products.

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Originally, Screen Gems thought about using a real band including The Dave Clarke Five or The Lovin’ Spoonful, which both turned them down, so they decided to go with four unknowns. The production company ran ads seeking musicians for an audition. Apparently about 400 people showed up, including Paul Williams and Stephen Stills. (Stills suggested his roommate Peter Tork because he did not want to give up his song publishing rights which the company demanded.) Fourteen actors were asked back for screen tests.

Micky Dolenz, whose father was actor George Dolenz, was in Circus Boy at age ten (under the name Mickey Braddock). Micky’s daughter Ami has also become a well-known actress. His agent sent him to the audition. Micky became the drummer and also played guitar at times.

Davy Jones had appeared on stage in “Oliver!” and on the Ed Sullivan Show. He was cast in some Columbia Pictures productions and he was identified before the ad went out as an actor who would be on the show. Davy played the tambourine and maracas but was the primary singer.

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Notice the spelling on Dolenz’s chair, who went by “Micky”

Michael Nesmith had been in the US Air Force. He had done some recording for Colpix, as had Jones. When he showed up at the audition, he had on a wool hat that kept his hair out of his eyes when he rode his motorcycle. It looked so well on him that he wore it for every show. Nesmith’s mom Betty was the inventor of Liquid Paper. Nesmith played guitar.

Peter Tork was Stephen Stills’ roommate. He had been performing regularly in Greenwich Village clubs but had recently moved to California and was working as a busboy. Peter was the busiest of the band members; he played guitar, keyboards, and sometimes banjo.

The main characters were only paid $450 per episode for the first year. The second season, they received a raise of $750. As a comparison, Dick Van Dyke made about $1500 per episode for his show. A decade later Valerie Bertinelli would earn about $20,000 an episode on One Day at a Time. Although they have made the show a hit, the top stars on The Big Bang Theory are making about $900,000 an episode. But that’s another blog! While they did receive standard royalties for their recordings, they received nothing from all the merchandising.

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Rafelson and Schneider hired director James Frawley to work with the quartet on improvisational comedy. The characters were stereotyped with Dolenz the funny guy, Jones the heart throb, Nesmith the smart one, and Tork the gullible one. Most people described the personalities as fitting for each of them except Tork. He was always painted as quiet and intellectual. The improv training helped because a lot of new film techniques were employed for the show including quick cuts, jump cuts, breaking the fourth wall, and rambling scenes that didn’t really fit into the theme of the show. When the show was short on time, bizarre additions included interviews with the boys about life or their views on current events. In one of the episodes I recently watched, they added Nesmith’s audition tape to the end of the show.

The pilot was filmed in San Diego and LA. Like earlier shows from the 1950s, the cast members often wore their own clothing. The final version received such high ratings that the show was given a two-year contract.

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Of course, the music was central to the show. The theme song was “(Theme From) The Monkees” written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. Part of the lyrics included, “We’re the young generation, and we’ve got something to say.” This captured the entire theme of the show. Some of the hit songs were “I’m A Believer”, “Daydream Believer”, “Last Train to Clarksville”, and “Pleasant Valley Sunday”.

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Playing in the band . . . or are they

Everyone one the show was a musician and could play a variety of instruments, but The Monkees did not actually play instruments for their songs. The public did not realize that the band did not really write or perform most of their music. Like the Partridge Family which debuted a few years later, they only provided the vocals. When this came out, viewers were unhappy. For the second season, the quartet began to write their own music and wore more hippy attire. Unfortunately, the damage was done, and the show never recovered its higher ratings.

While traveling around, the Monkees often ran into rival bands. The three who showed up most often were the Jolly Green Giants, The Four Martians, and The Foreign Agents.

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Here we see members of the Jolly Green Giants, The Four Martians and the Secret Agents.

Rose Marie, best known as Sally on The Dick Van Dyke Show, made two guest appearances on the show during the first season.

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Here is Rose Marie in their beach house. The mannequin behind her is Mr. Schneider.

The band lived in a two-story house on the beach. The first floor contained the living room, dining room, and kitchen. A bathroom was off one part of the kitchen and Davy and Peter’s bedroom was off the other end of the kitchen. The Monkees kept their instruments in the back alcove. A spiral staircase headed to the second floor where Mike and Micky had a bedroom. There were a lot of kitschy signs on the walls. There was also a mannequin named Mr. Schneider (he’s in the above photo behind Rose Marie) that would spout advice when his cord was pulled. Their landlord was Mr. Babbit who chastised them for breaking rules and not paying rent. Sometimes the Monkees pulled Babbit into their plots.

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The living room of the beach house

Another character on the show was the Monkeemobile. The car was a modified 1966 GTO. A third seat was added where the trunk had been. A fiberglass grille was added to the front of the car and exhaust pipes were on the back wheels. In all, three cars would be used for the tapings.

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When the first season ended, Davy Jones was no where to be found. While many rumors were flying, the real story was that he had received a draft notice. He fasted for a few weeks in order to fail his physical, which he did.

For the second season, the stars wanted to switch from half hour to an hour variety show with new artists appearing. NBC gave them an ultimatum to stick to the original idea or be cancelled. The group continued to push the new concept and in March of 1968, the show was cancelled.

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The series won two Emmys during its short time on the air—Directorial Achievement in Comedy and Outstanding Comedy Series. This win surprised me. The other nominees that year were The Andy Griffith Show, Bewitched, Get Smart, and Hogan’s Heroes.

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Bob Rafelson is wearing glasses and Bert Schneider is beside him.

It was seen on Saturday mornings in syndication from 1972-1973 which is when I remember watching it.

In 1986, MTV began airing the old shows, and many other networks put it on their schedules. Columbia Pictures decided to create a reboot of the show in 1987 called the New Monkees, but it flopped and lasted half a season. No surprise; of course it did. How could you recapture the same look and feel of the original 1960s show?

The DVDs came out in 2001, and in 2016 Blu-rays were introduced for their fiftieth anniversary.

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I was never able to take this show as seriously as the industry did. To me, it seemed a bit too wacky and exaggeratedly fast-paced. The plots were off the wall and hard to follow. I think part of it was my age. I was only five when the show was originally on. I do remember watching Batman live, but I think I was too young to follow the action in The Monkees and not quite the age where the music spoke to me. Perhaps I should give it another try; then again, perhaps it’s a show best kept in the memory of that time period. After watching several episodes, I must admit that I think it’s amazing that so many of us from the 1960s turned out as good as we did!

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A few day after I wrote this blog, Peter Tork passed away. RIP Peter. Thank you for the memories and music.